Women in Seafood: Patty Mann

Patty Mann is the Fresh Seafood Sales Manager with Icicle Seafoods. She has spent her entire life in the seafood industry, from working on long-line boats as a teen to running a fresh seafood company at 23. She has worked side-by-side with various producers, distributors, retailers and restaurants, handling both farmed and wild seafood. Ms. Mann has also traveled both domestically and internationally, visiting fish farms, fishing operations, seafood-processing plants, restauranteurs and retailers around the world. She enjoys navigating the complex challenges of the seafood industry as well as the amazing people involved in it.

Sea Delight: Sustainable seafood is an industry for the future. Maintaining a healthy ocean with responsibly sourced fish is simply good business. What attracted you to the seafood business in the first place?

Patty Mann: I started in the fish business at 18 when I thought it would be fun to work on fishing boats. (Some people go to Hollywood, but I thought the wide-open sea was a lot more exciting.) I spent five years working on head boats (aka party boats) and eventually moved to longline commercial boats.

This was in Barnegat Light, NJ. After the first cold snap, I decided that Florida might be a bit more welcoming. So I traveled to Key West where I became a deckhand on the Viking Starship, fishing Key West in the winter and Montauk in the summer.

After 2 years, I “graduated” to commercial boats longline fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. I spent another couple of years fishing the Gulf and ended up in Cape Canaveral where I was hired to oversee the seafood sales of a 21-boat, multi-faceted fishing company named Beeline Seafoods.

At 23, I attended Florida Atlantic University for a degree in International Business but quickly found my way back to the fishing industry where I applied that knowledge. At that point, I was hooked.

SD: The seafood industry is a significant contributor to the world’s growing need for healthy sustainable food. Why is sustainability important to you?

PM: From the first time I stepped on a boat, I’ve been concerned about the environment and the impact fishing has on our amazing seas. I also knew I would depend on the ocean for a living, so I had to do my part to preserve the environment.

I take my responsibility very seriously and understand how important it is to not only protect the resource but also determine the best way to feed a hungry world safe and healthy food. I’ve been a pescatarian (go ahead, Google it) since I started my fishing career in my teens, so I would say yes, I’m very committed.

SD: What are some of the projects you are currently working on that will enhance the future of the seafood industry?

PM: I don’t believe I could sleep at night if I didn’t represent fully sustainable fisheries. Fish farming continues to grow and I’ll promote any reasonable fish-farming venture I encounter. Working at Icicle Seafoods I get the unique opportunity to work for a producer of both farmed salmon (in Seattle) and the wild industry (in Alaska,) I fully believe in the sustainability of both fisheries.

It’s critically important for the U.S. population to understand that fish farming, even in national and local waters, is the way of the future and it can thrive in our waters without any negative impacts on the environment.

I frequently attend Global Aquaculture Association meetings to stay on top of any new developments in fish farming and have spent the last 16 years selling farmed salmon. On the wild side, I work with most of the major species out of Alaska, which is the only state with a mandate for sustainable seafood written into the State Constitution.

SD: The seafood industry is one of the most complex global systems in the world because it’s about feeding people. What has been your biggest challenge working in the industry in general and also addressing sustainable seafood?

PM: The biggest challenge we face as an industry is to put out a positive message, front and center. We spend so much time defending ourselves from negative press when we should be basking in the glory of an amazing industry that feeds the world healthy food.

Often when I mention to someone that I work in the seafood industry, it turns into an argument because they read somewhere that seafood is contaminated or farming is dangerous to the environment. We need to get more positive soundbites into the media to balance out the negative (and often unsubstantiated) messaging.

SD: The best leaders are lifelong learners. What have you learned most recently that has made an impact on your career?

PM: The one thing I’ve learned in this business is that you can’t stop learning. I don’t believe there’s a day that goes by that I don’t learn something new, due to the incredible diversity of seafood. I learn about cultures, currency, world trade, economies and science, just to name a few. The seafood industry is the greatest university in the world and it takes a sharp, omega-filled brain to comprehend even a small part of it.

SD: What advice would you give other women interested in a career in the seafood industry?

PM: Go for it! It’s an ever-growing, always-interesting industry that desperately needs more women. I look around the boardrooms and see nothing but opportunity, mostly due to the fact there are so few females occupying seats. But luckily the way has been paved for you so now is the perfect time for women to take their place in this diverse business.

My message to them: There are no better stewards of the world than women, which is why we need you in the seafood business. We quietly opened the door when the men weren’t looking, so come on in. The industry is waiting for you. Tell them Patty Mann sent you.

 

 

 

 

 

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Women in Seafood: Lenny Danuseputro

Lenny Danuseputro is the Marketing Director at PT. Inti Lautan Fajar Abadi (Intan Seafood) in Pasuruan, Indonesia. Prior to holding this position, she was the Operational Director at CV. Karya Samudra, a fishing company in Probolinggo, Indonesia, and Chief Accountant at PT. Kasogi International, tbk, a shoe manufacturing company in Sidoarjo, Indonesia. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting from the University of Surabaya, Indonesia and a Master’s degree in Commerce from the University of Sydney, Australia.

Sea Delight: Sustainable seafood is an industry for the future. Maintaining a healthy ocean with responsibly sourced fish is simply good business. What attracted you to the seafood business in the first place?

Lenny Danuseputro: My father was involved in operating boats since the 1980s. I was exposed to the seafood industry at a very young age. Seafood basically runs in our blood.

SD: The seafood industry is a significant contributor to the world’s growing need for healthy sustainable food. Why is sustainability important to you?

LD: The world is changing. We are not in the same place where we were many years ago. We have to do something now before we reach a point where the situation becomes irreversible. We are not only doing business but we also have a responsibility to supply the world with seafood constantly. Our role, and the only way to do it, is to make sure that we will have the supply for as long as we are going to need it.

SD: What are some of the projects you are currently working on that will enhance the future of the seafood industry?

LD: We are working with Traceall from the U.K. for the Tracebility Project as a part of our FIP Snapper/Grouper and we are taking these things seriously by following the steps and regulations from fishing, down to the end user’s plate. Traceall Global’s elog system will be installed on PT Inti Lautan Fajar Abadi’s vessels to track:

  • Where the fish was caught?
  • When the fish was caught?
  • By whom?

Method by which the fish was caught? Traceall Global is the U.K. and EU Government’s approved elog platform for fish traceability.

SD: The seafood industry is one of the most complex global systems in the world because it’s about feeding people. What has been your biggest challenge working in the industry in general and also addressing sustainable seafood?

LD: We have to maintain relationships with both nature and people/customers. These two things are correlated with each other and so we have to make both ends meet. This is one of our biggest challenges. However, with some of the establishments working with sustainability, we can make the gap closer and easier than before.

SD: The best leaders are lifelong learners. What have you learned most recently that has made an impact on your career?

LD: We are doing both fishing and processing. On the fishing side, we have to follow regulations on what our Government will require us to provide. On the processing side, whatever the customer requires us to do, we do it, in order for them to grow their business too. Doing the right things make us what we are now and have a good long term relationship with many good customers. I have to say, all the necessary things needed to improve on all sides of this business like fishing, factory as well as our products have to be considered.

SD: What advice would you give other women interested in a career in the seafood industry?

LD: The seafood business is not as easy as it looks but with hardwork, perseverance and determination to be successful, it is not beyond reach. Relationships are important at every step and we have to always find a way to maintain a good relationship with people like fishermen, workers, competitors, customers and, of course, with nature.  These are the things they will be needing in order to succeed in the Seafood industry.

 

 

 

 

Sea Delight International signs Agreement for Cooperation with Coral Sea Fishing PTY LTD in Australia

MIAMI, FL – Sea Delight International, with its Subsidiaries Sea Delight Canada and Sea Delight Europe, signed Memorandum of Understanding with Coral Sea Fishing Pty Limited in Australia, Part of the SOS Resources Group, to cooperate in the supply of Tasteless Smoke treated seafood products to Australia and New Zealand. Coral Sea Fishing holds the respective patents, technologies, intellectual property and rights to import, sell and trade Tasteless Smoke, Flavorless smoke and Filtered smoke treated seafood products in Australia and New Zealand.

“This new partnership opens up opportunities to develop new markets in Australia and New Zealand for Filtered Smoke treated seafood products, and Sea Delight will be able to provide technical assistance for the use of this innovative process as well as provide treated raw material to Coral Sea Fishing via our existing supply network,” says Eugenio Sanchez, Sea Delight President. “What is more, through this partnership we also share a common vision for sustainable seafood. Coral Sea Fishing has agreed to provide a financial contribution per pound to the Sea Delight Ocean Fund, Inc. on all imported product so that they may continue supporting Fishery Improvement Projects where this raw material is being sourced from,” says Sanchez.

“This is a partnership built on mutual goals. Collectively we have a very large and capable supply network all using the Flavorless, Tasteless Filtered Smoke Technology.  Together we are working on delivering high quality seafood products to our markets using natural shelf life extension processes derived from organics.  Our shared vision for sustainable seafood will ensure this is a win-win partnership, for seafood resources and our customers,” says Sean Cauchois, Director for Coral Sea Fishing Australia.

“We are very excited about this partnership between Sea Delight International  and Coral Sea Fishing in Australia,” says Adriana Sanchez, President of the Sea Delight Ocean Fund. “This is an incredible example of how companies can work together to help generate funding for fishery improvement projects in areas where their products are being sourced from. As we continue to grow our organization, it has been imperative that we work with our business partners to develop new and creative funding models so that we can continue to financially support these projects.”

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Coral Sea Fishing Pty Limited, founded in 1999 specializes in sourcing the best quality seafood, working with the latest natural innovative food technologies and is committed to protecting our seafood resources and providing the highest quality products. We specialize in New Product Development, Portion Control Programs and Shelf Life Extension of High Value Raw Material. Coral Sea Fishing focus on raw material from wild caught sustainably fished resources and sustainably farmed aquaculture projects. Coral Sea Fishing’s signature brand SUPERFRESH ® is Australia’s leading brand of frozen value added deep sea tuna products. For sales or further information, visit http://www.coralseafishing.com.au/

The Sea Delight Ocean Fund (SDOF), is a Miami, FL based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in 2012 to create and support global fishery improvement projects that promote awareness for responsible fishing practices and adequate management of the fishery with the goal of achieving seafood sustainability.  All proceeds from its annual “Taste of the Sea,” a Chef Competition and Grand Tasting event help further support fishery improvement projects in which the Sea Delight Ocean Fund participates. For further information about these projects, visit www.sdoceanfund.org

 

Sea Delight LLC operates in conjunction with ADS Seafood Inc., doing business as Atlantic Fisheries from its 16,000-square-foot headquarters located in the Doral area of Miami, Florida. Their international presence has grown with offices in Vietnam and Spain which help serve Sea Delight Canada, LLC and Sea Delight Europe, SLU. To view their sustainability policy, for sales or further information, visit http://www.sea-delight.com/

 

 

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